Archives for posts with tag: ruby

Earth allows you to find files across a large network of machines and track disk usage in real time. It consists of a daemon that indexes filesystems in real time and reports all the changes back to a central database. This can then be queried through a simple, yet powerful, web interface. Think of it like Spotlight or Beagle but operating system independent with a central database for multiple machines with a web application that allows novel ways of exploring your data.

Earth is initially focused on managing the explosion of data that occurs in digital visual effects work.

Project Page: http://open.rsp.com.au/projects/earth
Language: Ruby
Platform: Linux, Windows, OS X, etc
License: The GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2
Sponsor: Rising Sun Pictures

Camera tracking needs precise, hand-tailored 2D tracks. The promise of automatic 2D tracking is grand, but often fails expectations — mainly because auto-tracking algorithms cannot reliably link points which disappear or get obscured. For many shots 2D tracking by hand is a better option (it also allows you to speed up the solve by using less features). However, the solve also depends of the algorithm and it’s always beneficial to try the solve in all the matchmoving software available. Solving with the same features also gives a good comparison between different camera solving engines.

Tracksperanto allows you to track once in a program of your choice and then export the resulting features to all suppoorted 3D solving apps. Once there, it’s a 15 minute job to configure the camera and see if the solve comes out well or not. This method tends to yield very good results since you track at least one of the many 3D solvers on the market will give a correct computation. (more…)

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/tracksperanto/
Project Page: http://github.com/guerilla-di/tracksperanto
Language: pure ruby (no compilation required)
Platform: Windows, OSX, Linux
License: MIT

Film scans and images are usualy shoved about in DPX files. These files embed a massive amount of metadata which can be used to automatically catalog and search in big file collections (and searching is essential since a complete feature film will run well into tens of thousands of files). Reading this metadata can easily help with cumbersome tasks like sorting DPX files per reel/timecode, resolution, selective copying/processing and such daily tasks.

Additionally, depix supports editing of DPX metadata without the need to copy the file over (since files can be big). The metadata gets modified in-place without any copy operations, which is especially helpful when operating across a network.

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/depix/
Language: ruby
Platform: Windows, OS X, Linux
License: MIT

Working with timecodes is essential for any post workflow. We use our own timecode library which records timecode as two values (frames per second in float and the number of frames from zero as an integer). The Timecode class

  • does easy conversions (24 to 25 etc)
  • is sortable and comparable
  • can be used with ranges and link lists
  • supports calculations like multiplication, subtraction and division (timecode calculators galore!)
  • outputs itself in different formats – floating seconds with comma and dot, bit-packed SMPTE
  • parses user-friendly input patterns like “000100” and “10h 10s 10f”
  • is super easy to subclass and serialize

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/timecode/
Language: Pure Ruby (no compilation required)
Platform: Windows, OS X, Linux
License: MIT

The library assists in parsing EDL files in CMX 3600 format. You can use it to generate capture lists, inspect needed video segments for the assembled program and display edit timelines. Together with the depix module you could write your own “blind” conform utility in about 10 minutes, no joke.

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/edl/
Language: Pure Ruby (no compilation required)
Platform: Window, OS X, Linux
License: MIT