Archives for category: Untested

OpenFlipper is an OpenSource multi-platform application and programming framework designed for processing, modeling and rendering of geometric data.  Currently supported platforms are Windows, MacOS X and Linux. Using OpenMesh a variety of file formats are supported ( off, obj, ply, … ).

Additionally OpenFlipper provides a highly flexible interface for creating and testing own geometry processing algorithms. A powerfull scripting language can be used to access all parts of OpenFlipper and modify geometry or the user interface at runtime.

For more information about OpenFlipper and its features take a look at the Introduction page.

Home Page: http://openflipper.org
Language: C++
Platform: Linux, Windows, OS X
License: GPL v3

OpenMesh is a generic and efficient data structure for representing and manipulating polygonal meshes. OpenMesh is developed at the Computer Graphics Group, RWTH Aachen . It is funded by the German Ministry for Research and Education ( BMBF).
It was designed with the following goals in mind :

  1. Flexibility : provide a basis for many different algorithms without the need for adaptation.
  2. Efficiency : maximize time efficiency while keeping memory usage as low as possible.
  3. Ease of use : wrap complex internal structure in an easy-to-use interface.

Home Page: http://openmesh.org
Language: C++
Platform: Linux, Windows, OS X
License: GNU GPL and LGPL

Film scans and images are usualy shoved about in DPX files. These files embed a massive amount of metadata which can be used to automatically catalog and search in big file collections (and searching is essential since a complete feature film will run well into tens of thousands of files). Reading this metadata can easily help with cumbersome tasks like sorting DPX files per reel/timecode, resolution, selective copying/processing and such daily tasks.

Additionally, depix supports editing of DPX metadata without the need to copy the file over (since files can be big). The metadata gets modified in-place without any copy operations, which is especially helpful when operating across a network.

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/depix/
Language: ruby
Platform: Windows, OS X, Linux
License: MIT

Working with timecodes is essential for any post workflow. We use our own timecode library which records timecode as two values (frames per second in float and the number of frames from zero as an integer). The Timecode class

  • does easy conversions (24 to 25 etc)
  • is sortable and comparable
  • can be used with ranges and link lists
  • supports calculations like multiplication, subtraction and division (timecode calculators galore!)
  • outputs itself in different formats – floating seconds with comma and dot, bit-packed SMPTE
  • parses user-friendly input patterns like “000100” and “10h 10s 10f”
  • is super easy to subclass and serialize

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/timecode/
Language: Pure Ruby (no compilation required)
Platform: Windows, OS X, Linux
License: MIT

The library assists in parsing EDL files in CMX 3600 format. You can use it to generate capture lists, inspect needed video segments for the assembled program and display edit timelines. Together with the depix module you could write your own “blind” conform utility in about 10 minutes, no joke.

Home Page: http://guerilla-di.org/edl/
Language: Pure Ruby (no compilation required)
Platform: Window, OS X, Linux
License: MIT